• Highly trained, compassionate doctors & staff

    Highly trained, compassionate doctors & staff

  • Doctor-supervised boarding with covered, fresh air play yard

    Doctor-supervised boarding with covered, fresh air play yard

  • Texas and nationally registered heritage practice, opened in 1946

    Texas and nationally registered heritage practice, opened in 1946

  • American Animal Hospital Assocation (AAHA) Accredited practice

    American Animal Hospital Assocation (AAHA) Accredited practice

  • All of our doctors earn 50 hours of advanced training each year

    All of our doctors earn 50 hours of advanced training each year

  • Isolation ward keeps patients safe from exposure to infectious diseases

    Isolation ward keeps patients safe from exposure to infectious diseases

  • Trustworthy, competitively priced in-house and online pharmacies

    Trustworthy, competitively priced in-house and online pharmacies

  • Ashley Harrison Memorial Pet Fund for the rescue and treatment of animals in need

    Ashley Harrison Memorial Pet Fund for the rescue and treatment of animals in need

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  • Highly trained, compassionate doctors & staff

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Choose an AAHA Accredited Practice

Accreditation by AAHA requires evaluation of nearly 900 standards of care and service, with rigorous periodic inspections.

We hold ourselves to a higher standard because your pet deserves nothing less.

Learn More

Heavy Rains Causing Flea & Mosquito Problems for Pets

Due to the torrential rain we have experienced in North Texas this summer, there have been vast increases in the populations of fleas and mosquitoes. These tiny pests are not only annoying to us and our pets, but can also be dangerous.

Adult fleas infest pets commonly. Not only can this cause severely aggravating itching, but it can also lead to more severe problems. Adult fleas feed off of your pet’s blood, and severe infestations may lead to anemia.

Eating a flea may also cause your pet to become infected with tapeworms. Some animals are actually allergic to fleas, and the bite of a single flea will lead them to severe scratching, biting, hair loss, and self mutilation.

In addition, fleas may also bite any humans in the vicinity.

If unsure that your pet has fleas, look for signs like itching or “flea dirt,” which looks like coffee grounds against the pet’s skin. One flea on your pet means that there are far more in the environment. Only the adult form of the flea lives on your pet – the eggs and larval stages all exist in the environment.

Flea prevention is best achieved with products from your veterinarian, such as Advantage or Frontline. Over the counter products are also available, but are not as strong as prescription products, often do not last an entire month, and can actually make your pet sick.

Mosquitoes are among the most annoying of all insects: they also present the greatest health risk for cats and dogs. Mosquitoes are carriers for heartworms, which means that a mosquito’s bite also directly transmits the larval form of the heartworm into the victim’s blood stream.

Adult heartworms live in the dog’s heart, as well as the pulmonary vessels. The blockage and structural damage that they cause within the heart and pulmonary vessels directly lead to congestive heart failure and serious pulmonary lesions.

Because Texas is one of the most severely affected states in the country, dogs should be tested for heartworms annually to ensure their continued health and because early detection of an infection may help prevent further damage to the pet’s heart and lungs. Dogs that are early in the infection show no clinical signs at all. All dogs, whether they are primarily outdoors or indoors, should be kept on heartworm prevention year-round. Veterinary products such as Heartgard are the safest and strongest for your pet. Remember, prevention is far easier for your dog and cheaper for you than treatment!!

  • The Flu and You!

    The Flu and You!

    Canine influenza (“dog flu”) is a highly contagious virus which has 2 strains in the U.S.* Both strains are still currently being identified throughout the country, mostly in shelters, which are “high density” settings in which stray and/or unvaccinated dogs come and go in high numbers. Locally, a case was Read More
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